Last edited by Jugis
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of European peatlands found in the catalog.

European peatlands

Roger Goodwillie

European peatlands

by Roger Goodwillie

  • 156 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Council of Europe in Strasbourg .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Europe.
    • Subjects:
    • Nature conservation -- Europe.,
    • Peatlands -- Europe.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Roger Goodwillie.
      SeriesNature and environment series ;, no. 19
      ContributionsCouncil of Europe. European Committee for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQH77.E9 G66 1980
      The Physical Object
      Paginationi, 75 p. :
      Number of Pages75
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2956153M
      LC Control Number84198862

      Two new peatland books were announced by our members and (co-)authors Tapio Lindholm and Harri Vasander: 1) H Joosten, F Tanneberger & A Moen (Eds.) () Mires and Peatlands of Europe, Status, Distribution and Conservation 2) J Laine, H Vasander, J-P Hotanen, H Nousiainen, M Saarinen & T Penttilä () Suotyypit ja turvekankaat. Today Ireland can boast to having one quarter of a million hectares of conserved peatlands in Europe. Before the ’s there was very little thought of peatland conservation in Ireland. This changed with the help of the Dutch nation and the Dutch-Irish Bog Conservation campaign to save bogs in Ireland.

        This book provides the first comprehensive and up-to-date overview of mires and peatlands in biogeographic Europe. Authored by mire specialists, the extensive volume describes mire and peatland types, terms, extent, distribution, use, conservation, and restoration, individually for each European country and in an integrated manner for the.   Peatlands cover just a few per cent of the global land area but they store almost one-quarter of all soil carbon and so play a crucial role in regulating the climate. My colleagues and I .

      Proceedings, books and magazines for members and friends. Mailing costs will be added. Summer break during 17 July - 12 August. 10% Discount for IPS members. See Peatlands International event page for details:) Proceedings, books and magazines for members and friends. Mailing costs will be .   The 6-plus million acres of peatlands in Northern Minnesota are considered by some to be the last of its true, untouched wilderness and its most valuable ecosystem. They are the greatest amount of natural wetlands in the lower 48 states. More than 80 percent of the wetlands here are still intact and undisturbed from pre-European settlement years.


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European peatlands by Roger Goodwillie Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mires and Peatlands in Europe provides – for the first time in history – a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of mires and peatlands in biogeographic Europe. Written by authors, the book describes mire and peatland types, terms, extent, distribution, use, conservation, and restoration individually for each country and integrated for.

European peatlands. Strasbourg: Council of Europe, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, International government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Roger Goodwillie; Council of Europe.

European Committee for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Based on the ‘European Mires Book’ of the International Mire Conservation Group (IMCG), European peatlands book article provides a composite map of national datasets as the first comprehensive peatland map for the whole of Europe.

We also present estimates of the extent of peatlands and mires in each European country individually and for the entire Size: KB. Description: The first comprehensive and up-to-date overview of mires and peatlands in biogeographic Europe.

Authored by specialists, the extensive volume describes mire and peatland types, terms, extent, distribution, use, conservation, and restoration, individually for each European country and in an integrated manner for the entire continent.

This paper derives the distribution of peatland in Europe as the extent of peat and peat-topped soils indicated by soil databases. The data sources were theEuropean Soil Database (v1.

In the study ‘Widespread drying of European peatlands in recent centuries’ published this week in the scientific journal Nature Geoscience, the group of researchers found that nearly half of the study sites are the driest they have been for the last 1, years.

While changes to temperature and rainfall have significantly contributed to peatland drying, 42 percent of the sites had been. Buy The Biology of Peatlands () (): NHBS - Håkan Rydin, John K Jeglum, Oxford University Press.

- Peatlands are lands with a naturally accumulated peat layer at their surface. In their natural state, peatlands support a large range of habitats and provide a home for unique biodiversity.

Even though peatlands extend over a relatively small portion of the earth’s land surface, they hold a large pool of carbon. Along with storing large quantities of carbon, peatlands also play an. The IPS hopes the book “Peatlands and Climate Change” is one step ahead in the road of wise use of peatlands and peat.

In many European countries, GHG emissions from. Today the value of peatlands for a healthy environment, fertile soils, biodiversity, freshwater supply, flood prevention, and – a matter of high importance in an age of global warming – as a massive store of carbon is undisputed.

Yet, in practice, peatland degradation and habitat loss across Europe is ongoing. The European Commission recently.

Cambridge Core - Ecology and Conservation - Peatland Restoration and Ecosystem Services - edited by Aletta Bonn. Drying peatlands could release carbon, worsening climate change, according to scientists Carla Passino Octo As well as being scenic, peatlands are important carbon sinks but this important function could be lost as they progressively dry out, threatening to.

Peatlands store a large share of the world’s soil organic carbon and are widespread in Northern and Central European countries. Drainage is a precondition for traditional agricultural production on. Order Sphagnum Mosses - The Stars of European Mires Book contents and sample pages Peatlands represent a wide variety of wetlands that are characterized by an organic soil, but differ in hydrology, chemistry, and, consequently, vegetation composition.

In Finland, one third of the land area is composed of peatlands. This book is filled with wonderful photos and detailed vegetation notes, and it is full of new and interesting details on European peatlands (written in German). Joosten and Clarke explores what we know from a conservation point of view, and Bauerochse and Hassmann is an edited series of chapters on peatlands as archaeological sites.

Du Rietz GE. Die Mineralbodenwasserzeigergrenze als Grundlage einer natürichen Zweigliederung der nord- und mitteleuropäischen Moore [The mineral soil water boundary indicator as the foundation for a natural two-part division of northern and central European peatlands].

Vegetatio. ;5–– Peat (/ p iː t /), sometimes known as turf (/ t ɜːr f /), is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation or organic is unique to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or muskegs.

The peatland ecosystem covers million square kilometres and is the most efficient carbon sink on the planet, because peatland plants capture CO 2 naturally released from the peat.

Peat is an organic wetland soil made from part-decomposed plant debris, more commonly found in cool environments, such as northern Russia, Europe and Canada. Healthy peatlands. Peatlands have, hence, over the l years helped to remove significant amounts of CO 2 from the atmosphere.

A complicating factor in this respect is that in terms of the major greenhouse gases (GHGs), peatlands are not just acting as a sink for CO 2. Peatlands are referred to by various names such as bogs, fens, and mires.

According to the IPS, a mire refers to a peatland where peat is actively being formed (Table ).A bog, also known as an ombrogenous mire, is raised above the surrounding landscape and receives water only from precipitation.A fen, or geogenous mire, is situated in depressions and receives water that has been in.

Currently, the GPD contains geospatial data on peatlands and organic soils for all European countries (except Moldova). Recent information on status, distribution, and conservation of mires and peatlands in Europe is summarised in the European Mires Book.

It includes descriptions from 49 countries and other geographic entities in Europe.Northern peatlands constitute a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH 4).However, management of undisturbed peatlands, as well as the restoration of disturbed peatlands, will alter the exchange of CH 4 with the atmosphere.

The aim of this systematic review and meta‐analysis was to collate and analyze published studies to improve our understanding of the factors that control CH 4.

Peatlands and Environmental Change provides a comprehensive summary of peatland science. The emphasis is on peatlands as dynamic parts of the landscape that are undergoing constant change as a result of processes of peat accumulation and development, as well as through human activity and climatic s: 2.